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The famous Globe Threatre, once home to playwright William Shakespeare, has announced a production on Joan of Arc in which the young saint is “non-binary” and “queer”.

“I, Joan”, a play about the life and death of Saint Joan of Arc, is expected to start running at the end of August.

In the play, Saint Joan of Arc will be presented as “non-binary” and “non-gender conforming”.

“Theaters have nothing to do with ‘historical reality’. Theaters produce plays and in plays anything can be possible,” the Globe boasted on its website.

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“Shakespeare did not write historically accurate plays. He took figures from the past to ask questions about the world around him. Our writers today are not doing otherwise, whether it is Ann Boleyn, Nell Gwynn, Emilia Bassano, Edoardo II or Joan. d’Arco. “

Joan of Arc, born as a farmer in rural France in the 15th century, claimed to have received messages and guidance from God that would help the French kingdom repel the invading English forces.

Joan claimed to receive divine instruction through multiple visions of saints and angels. His advice and his leadership on the battlefield led the French to an unlikely victory and saved the country from the British.

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Joan is often depicted wearing male battle suits and armor normally worn only by men.

However, the saint has always referred to herself as a woman and insisted on being called “Giovanna the girl”.

People pass in front of Shakespeare’s Globe Theater in central London on 24 August 2020.
(Tolga Akmen / AFP via Getty Images)

The Globe’s statement continued: “The story has provided countless and wonderful examples of Joan being portrayed as a woman. This production simply offers the possibility of another point of view. This is the role of the theater: simply asking the question ‘imagine if? ‘ “

Despite the acknowledgment of taking historical liberties, The Globe did not shy away from classifying the young saint as “queer”.

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The Globe published along with its ad an accompanying essay in which Dr. Kit Heyam, a “trans awareness coach” and “heritage practitioner”, claimed that Joan of Arc was indeed making a conscious statement about her gender by wearing the male battle armor while repelling the invading forces.

Interior of the Globe Theater London, associated with William Shakespeare.

Interior of the Globe Theater London, associated with William Shakespeare.
(Photo 12 / Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

“The pragmatic explanations typically offered for Joan’s gender nonconformity – military practicality, gender stereotypes, protection from sexual assault – make sense from the privileged perspective of a society where what we wear and how we act is not intended to have no automatic connection with our identity, “wrote Heyam. “But, in fact, ‘who we are’ and ‘what we do’ has never been easy to separate or make fun of.”

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Heyam went on to say that Joan’s menswear and battlefield leadership was not just “practical” but a “spiritually motivated” act of “gender nonconformity”.

“For Joan, gender nonconformity was clearly never just a practical matter,” Heyam wrote. “Joan is also part of a long, cross-cultural history of people who have experienced their gender nonconformity as being spiritually motivated.”

Hayem went on to accuse other historical figures of secret queer personal identities, including Queen Elizabeth I.

Roman Catholic Saint Joan of Arc (1412 - 1431) entering Orléans, France, 1429. From an original engraving by W. Hulland after a painting by Henri Scheffer.

Roman Catholic Saint Joan of Arc (1412 – 1431) entering Orléans, France, 1429. From an original engraving by W. Hulland after a painting by Henri Scheffer.
(Kean Collection / Getty Images)

Apparently the Globe also refused to refer to historian Joan as a woman in its statements.

Instead, both the character and the historical person Joan of Arc are referred to as “them” in all cases in The Globe’s statements and essays.

“Me, Joan” opens on August 25th.

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