The five-time world 100m champion, who took victory by a full metre, has now become the first woman to beat 10.7 six times in a season.

Fellow countrywoman Shericka Jackson set a personal best of 10.71 as she attempted to keep pace with Fraser-Pryce, finishing second, while Ivory Coast’s Marie-Josée Ta Lou finished third with an African record of 10.72.

“Being able to run 10.6 consistently means a lot to me,” Fraser-Pryce said.

“It’s remarkable. It’s very difficult to maintain the speed at this high level. I’m in my thirties and I think I have more to give,” added the 35-year-old.

In 2017, Fraser-Pryce had an emergency C-section when she had son Zyon, subsequently taking two years off the track to rehabilitate and focus on motherhood.

Faced with fears of never reaching the top of the sport again, the new mother has only gotten better with each passing year, winning a record fifth 100m title at the World Championships in July.

“I look forward to doing my best for the rest of the season,” she added.

Florence Griffith-Joyner still holds the women’s 100m record in 10.49 seconds from 1988, ahead of Jamaica’s Elaine Thompson-Herah and Fraser-Pryce on the all-time list.

Elsewhere, Olympic and world champion Faith Kipyegon broke Kenya’s record, meet record and her personal best in the 1500m, but narrowly missed Ethiopia’s Genzebe Dibaba’s 2015 world record of 3:50, 07.

“I’ve been looking for the weather for a while but I’m happy with my personal best,” said Kipyegon, who returned to the sport in 2019 after the birth of her first child.

“I knew it was the best place to get the world record, so I’m disappointed to have lost it in the last meters.”

Ben Church contributed reporting.

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